Cycle lanes in Beijing



Came across this article in ‘Today’.

Latest estimates put the population to 17 million. I have been to Beijing and I should say it is a pretty congested town. It seems like they go through extreme measures to keep the vehicle count on the road down (similar to our weekend COE idea).

China is probably the largest car market right now and there is obvoiusly lot of money to be made in selling cars (They can have a COE system and an ERP system and I suppose the demand for car would not go down. It will be a good revenue stream for the Beijing Municipality. They can build better roads and better Public transportation with that money.

But it seems like they are doing neither. Instead, they plan to inconvenience car drivers by bringing back bike lanes.

Makes me wonder. If China (who are fighting for their right to develop at a rapid pace) can think of solving their traffic and pollution woes by introducing bike lanes, why does Singapore think the other way around?

I am not saying bring us bike lanes. I am just saying divert your attention from cyclists (and educating them) to Drivers (and how they can be made responsible for their actions on the road).



2 Responses to “Cycle lanes in Beijing

  • 1
    Al
    January 29th, 2010 09:46

    I fully agree with you Nat. Educating the drivers must start, blaming the cyclists must stop!

    I don’t think the government has the political will to really make cycling an alternative serious form of transport, though they have tackled it from a recreation point of view with the brilliant PCNs.

    Until that somehow resolves, we who ride on the roads must use our best defence – high visibility and defensive riding. In Perth, we are spoilt with so many dedicated bike paths.

  • 2
    nat
    January 29th, 2010 11:23

    Good to hear from you :)

    I have received ‘advice’ from many colleagues who drive (and don’t cycle) about staying safe on road. They do it with good intention but most do not see that the ‘advising’ culture is due to them believing that the road belongs to them. I politely listen to them and tell them to look out for cyclists.

    The willingness to see the situation from the others perspective is difficult to learn. I expect leaders and people in authority to be able to ‘see’ things from all perspectives and not make silly arguments. As a result educating by example. But the recent furore over cyclists and cars raised by Zulfiki is an example of the wrong sort.

    The PCN’s are great and it is encouraging more people to ‘learn’ cycling again but we need tolerant traffic conditions for cycling culture to be sustained.

    I don’t expect to see Perth style bike paths anytime soon but I do hope that the authorities do not encourage motorists to think they own the roads :(

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